Environment

Kim Reynolds responds to EPA’s new biofuel blending targets

The Environmental Protection Agency has announced new requirements for the amount of ethanol and biodiesel that must be blended into the nation’s fuel supply, and in an unprecedented move, the EPA has proposed significant reductions in blending levels for 2020. Those levels were already set in 2019, but they did not take into consideration Consider the unexpectedly large drop in fuel demand due to the pandemic. The EPA also proposed reducing the amount of renewable fuels required for 2021, but proposed a significant increase in blend levels for 2022. They also announced the rejection of 65 Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) refinery waiver requests that have been pending since Biden took office, and are set to enter The changes take effect once the proposal goes through the public comment process. Objectives and restrictions on blending exemptions, the EPA proposal has drawn heavy criticism from many senior Iowa Republicans along with farmers and producers of renewable fuels. Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds called the 2020 and 2021 renewable volume commitments “a slap in the face to Iowa farmers and renewable fuel producers and a direct contradiction to President Biden’s multiple campaign promises.” Emily Schorr, CEO of Growth Energy, said, “This unprecedented move not only bypasses the EPA’s statutory authority under the RFS, but fails to recognize the law’s built-in mechanism that adjusts requirements when fuel demand differs from expectations. The original. The EPA’s 2020 gallon plan is a boon to petroleum companies at the expense of rural families and future investment in low-carbon energy.” But David Swenson, a research economist at Iowa State University, said the EPA’s proposal is a “reflection of reality.” In 2020, the country produced only 124.62 billion gallons of motor fuel, 10% of which was 12.6 billion gallons of ethanol, which is roughly the 14 billion gallons they had before the pandemic.” “What the RFS did was just say that in 2020 all it takes is To be blended was 12.6 billion gallons or so of ethanol into the nation’s fuel supply. Agricultural interests and ethanol are fading, but that’s all the country’s fuel supply can absorb. 2020. So it’s somewhat disingenuous for them to act like the RFS is somehow doing farmers and doing ethanol interests wrong when it’s just a reflection of reality.”

The Environmental Protection Agency has announced new requirements for how much ethanol and biodiesel must be blended into the nation’s fuel supply.

In an unprecedented move, the Environmental Protection Agency has proposed deep cuts to blend levels for 2020. These levels were already set in 2019, but did not take into account the unexpectedly large drop in fuel demand due to the pandemic. The Environmental Protection Agency has also proposed reducing the amount of renewable fuels required for 2021.

However, they proposed a significant increase in blend levels for 2022. They also announced the rejection of 65 Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) refinery waiver requests that have been pending since Biden took office.

Changes are set to take effect once the proposal goes through the public comment process.

Despite some positive comments about the 2022 blending targets and restrictions on blending exemptions, the EPA’s proposal drew heavy criticism from many senior Iowa Republicans along with farmers and producers of renewable fuels.

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Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds called the 2020 and 2021 renewable volume commitments “a slap in the face to Iowa farmers and renewable fuel producers and a direct contradiction to President Biden’s multiple campaign promises.”

Emily Schorr, CEO of Growth Energy, said, “This unprecedented move not only bypasses the EPA’s statutory authority under the RFS, but fails to recognize the law’s built-in mechanism that adjusts requirements when fuel demand differs from expectations. The original EPA 2020 gallon plan is a grant to petroleum companies at the expense of rural families and future investment in low-carbon energy.”

But David Swenson, an economics research scientist at Iowa State University, said the EPA’s proposal was a “reflection of reality.”

“In 2020, the nation produced only 124.62 billion gallons of motor fuel. 10% of that is 12.6 billion gallons of ethanol, roughly 14 billion gallons it had. [set] before the epidemic.

What RFS [Renewable Fuel Standard] Doing so was just saying that for 2020 all that needed to be blended was 12.6 billion gallons or so of ethanol into the nation’s fuel supply. Farm interests and ethanol are faltering, but that’s all the country’s fuel supply can absorb in 2020. So it’s somewhat disingenuous for them to act like the RFS somehow is doing farmers and doing ethanol interests wrong when it’s just a reflection of reality.”

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